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of the world is, the united states and through president obama to announce our intentions and our way forward. but they have a deep understanding of why this is important for nato, why this is important for the larger international community. and i think that given the right measures of accountability that we need to be seeking from president karzai and his government, we're going to see a commitment not just from germany but from many of our nato allies. >> rose: might they make up whatever the gap is between what general mcchrystal is seeking and what the united states is prepared to provide in terms of troops? >> well, i think we have to wait for the president's announcement. but we will be, as we have been, consulting very deeply our allies and talking about what we want to see from them in order to have this integrated military and civilian strategy. because, remember it's not just about troops on the ground, it's about making sure that the people of afghanistan see the results of this effort. that they have more faith in their own government as of... as an entity that can deliver for th
chief for "alternate." will also talk with a guest about the united states effort to resolve longstanding difference between israelis and palestinians. also note tim brown of the 9/11 network coalition. he will be here to talk was about the december 5 rally in new york against bernanke 9/11 suspects to a federal courthouse in lower manhattan. . . american icons, continues tonight at 8:00 p.m., with the history, art and architecture of the most symbolic structures, tonight at 8:00 p.m. on c-span and get your own copy of american icons, a three-disk set, $24.95. order on-line at c-span.org/store. now a look back at cuban missile crisis, with kennedy advisors ted sornson and carol kasem. from the kennedy library in boston, this is an hour and 15 minutes. this war policy was done in secret and steps were taken to deceive us by every means they could. they were planning in november to open to the world the fact that they had these missiles so close to the united states, not that they are with intending to fire them, because if they were going to get into a niewg clear struggle, th
important to the united states? >>> india is going to be central to what we want to do in the world. >>> also, a disturbing new trend. police say they can't keep track of all of the registered sex offenders. there are just too many to keep an eye on. the internet provides easy prey. how can you keep your family safe? >>> good evening, and thanks for joining us. at this hour, we're waiting for the prime minister of india, manmohan singh, to arrive at the white house. president obama and the first lady will pay invitation to the first dinner. the list includes hollywood stars and business chiefs. 320 people will gather under a white house tent in the south lawn. singer jennifer hudson will headline the event. the symphony orchestra and the marine band will also perform. earlier today, president obama met with the indian prime minister and called them natural allies. topping the topics, global warming and trade. president obama has promised to visit india next year. >>> now to president obama's big decision on the war in afghanistan. the president said today he plans on finishing the j
to the import of work ahead, and thank you for coming today. may god continue to bless the united states of america. [applause] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2009] >> still to come, a discussion on attorney general eric holder's announcement to hold civilian trial support 9/11 plotters in new york city. after that, today's memorial service for pulitzer prize winner jack nelson. later, another chance to see former president george w. bush reflect on his a-year presidency and decisions made during his administration. the u.s. house is back in session tomorrow at 2:00 eastern for legislative business. live coverage of the house is on c-span. the senate also returns tomorrow, continuing work on fiscal year 2010 federal spending for the veterans department and military construction. majority leader harry reid has said the senate may began its healthcare debate later in the week. the senate will gavel in at 2:00 p.m. eastern. live coverage on c-span2. >> c-span's 2010 student camp contest is here. the top prize is $5,
>>> this is "gps" the global public square. welcome to our viewers in the united states and around the world. i'm fareed zakaria coming to you this week from london. we begin the show wan exclusive interview with maziar bahari "the newsweek" reporter who spent four months in an iranian prison. he's written about it in this week's "newsweek." he has a harrowing, moving tale to tell. and then the main event. i'm just back from new deli where i spoke with the prime minister of india manmolian singh. let's get started. everyone has forgotten you, those were words maziar bahari heard every day from interrogators during the four months he spent in solitary confine in the an iranian prison. maziar is my colleague, a fine journalist who works for "newsweek" he's also an award-winning filmmaker. he was arrested along with hundreds of others during the protests that followed iran's disputed election. the end of his ordeal came in october when he was released on bail of $3 billion reales, equal to $300,000 american dollars. he flew back to his home in london just days before his wife paola ga
square. welcome to our viewers in the united states and around the world. i'm fareed zakaria coming to you this week from london. we begin the show with an exclusive interview with maziar bahari, the "newsweek" reporter who spent four months in an iranian prison. he has written about it in this week's "newsweek." he has a harrowing, moving tale to tell. and then the main event. i'm just back from new delhi where i spoke with the prime minister of india manmohan singh. in his only television interview on his trip to washington, d.c. let's get started. -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com >>> everyone has forgotten you. those were words maziar bahari heard every day from interrogators during the four months he spent in solitary confinement in an iranian prison. maziar is my colleague, a fine journalist who works for "newsweek." he's also an award-winning filmmaker. he was arrested along with hundreds of others during the protests that followed iran's disputed election. the end of his ordeal came in october when he was released on bail of $3 billion reales, equal to 300,000 american d
and come to the united states and harm us physically or our nato allies or others. that's our quest. now can that quest be coupled with the ideas for nato -- schools, building a police force that is not corrupt, but also is efficient, and to do this in a country in which the literacy rate is so low, the poverty is so endemocratic. the whole traditions of dealing with money as to who your friends were is really so much a part of just existing. i think for the moment, the president from press accounts is looking at it province by province. he's looking at being in the medium-sized cities as well as the hamlets in the country. how does this match up with what we are doing with a line drawn by europeans a long time ago to divide the countries? do we understand the poshtoon culture? well, yes and no, and we're all learning fast, including the president, but i think we are learning. if the president does come forward with a plan or plans, he must make that very specific. and that is a very big quest. it will not do to have a tentative feeling that now you see if, now you don't, and this is amo
that this is not an unending responsibility of the united states without limit. senator lugar pointed out the issue of cost. you know, we have over eight years in iraq and afghanistan under the bush administration not paid for any of those military operations. now that is coming home to reckon in terms of the huge deficit. we have to move forward and support this operation responsibly. but the president -- i think the key to the president's response is laying down a strategy, informing the american public of what's at stake, and i think that when they listen and when they hear, they will be supportive, but it will be a support that has to be continually developed and strengthened going forward. >> you've both mentioned the cost. let me ask you, we're going to talk to chairman david obey of the house proportions committee later in the program. he wants a special war surtax, wants it laid out, so the american people know, here's what's going to pay for iraq and afghanistan. senator reed, to you first, do you support that? do you think it should be broken out separately so the american people get a separate b
's talk about the president in congratulating happened karzai made it perfectly clear the united states expects a more serious effort to end corruption in his government and he is -- and they are ready to defend itself once the u.s. is out. >> his power base is a series of war lords and their mignons who are paid off through this vast system of patronage and he's tried to balance power that way and it has enabled him to stay in office but it tainted him with this awful, deep-seeded corruption and tainted the united states as well because he's our guy. >> reporter: putting him in office or that's what the taliban says and upsetting the election to the point that abdullah abdullah pull out the taliban says we have won. how does the united states go forward. 40,000 troops, 20,000, 50,000 troops. does the number of troops make a difference between the public in afghanistan sees us as partly responsible for putting this government in. >> i don't think it does. the u.s. strategy from the beginning has been to build a strong, trusted central government, which is not something that afghanistan
that was licensed in the united states. we have done those things. we have shifted all the vaccine manufacturing to the extent we can to multi those virus first because there faster to fill, with leaving the rest of leftover for the single dose syringes. we have worked with them to shift everything they can do to get the vaccine out as fast as they possibly can. then we are tracking through the process step by step. to the degree that when a lot is ready to be released at a manufacturer, we have a truck waiting. it pulls up at the loading dock ready to accept that vaccine and bring it to the distribution sites. if we have been working through this every step of the process to get any delays out. that is what a sight visits have largely been about. >> a question about the contracts. [unintelligible] to produce this reject all under 51 million doses, kabbalah contracted the manufacturers to fill 117 million doses. why aren't they able to undo the full amount of doses -- able to do the full amount of doses? >> we need to make sure we have enough vaccine derived the time people want it and being ca
it from europe, you see it from the united states and you see it from asia. tell me what you see. >> well, i see a very different situation. in europe there is no recovery and i think 2010's going to be a mediocre year in europe. same thing in japan. we don't see any recovery. we see resistance to the decline but no recovery. in the united states, things look more promising for the short term. you know, after a very large chop in the economy and particularly in the automobile industry. >> rose: but generally those impressions you just said are about the economy overall. >> yeah, but the economy overall we see slight growth in 2010. but a situation very different from one country to the other. >> rose: at what point in an economic recovery do consumers think about automobiles? >> well, you know, it depends where the consumer is. if he's in china or in brazil or india, he's thinking all the time about automobiles. what's the best opportunity? what's the best deal? and we're seeing these sales booming all the time. you know, no matter what. now, in that time, you have an increase of 5% or 10
-- and i would say enthusiastic role by the united states of america, these negotiations will not yield the kind of the kind of results that we are looking for. true, we would have hoped that the united states of america would have been more ambitious than what it has indicated. >> reporter: india is also one of the world's largest producers of greenhouse gas emissions, but is a relative newcomer to an industrialized economy. saran says the country has concerns that a climate agreement could stifle economic development. >> for us, climate change is not just a separate issue, it is intermixed with our developmental, you know, issues itself. so how we balance, you know, the problem of climate change with the other stresses and strains that the country is going through as this process of social and economic transformation, we would hope that there is some understanding of that challenge that we face. >> reporter: meantime, a series of studies released today in the british medical journal "the lancet" could give another boost to advocates of addressing climate change. the studies found that
is it when a united states citizen is declared disabled they have to wait time before they can get medicaid or medicare? host: 8 collar like that, better worse off? -- a caller like that. . guest: there are obviously community health clinics and other medical facilities that provide medical care cheaply or, in the cases of need, for free. i'm not minimizing the collar's husband's typical. i am sure -- caller's husband's difficulty. but there is health care available in the country for people who cannot afford to pay. ad. caller: good morning, michigan. host: michigan. i'm sorry. caller: i just wanted to say the last time i checked, unemployment was 19.5%, and my husband, who just had his 29th anniversary at the company he worked at has been laid off and is losing his mind. i would be crying if i thought it would do any good, but it will not. he is doing everything he can to find a job. as soon as he sees something in the newspaper, he goes there. he is so talented, he can fix anything, but he is 65 years old, too, and that is a problem. a few weeks ago, senator lugar? he was on "newsmakers"
is mmitted tohe effort in ahanistan. they're waiting, like the rest of the world i, the united states andhrough president obama to announc our ientions and our way forward. but they have a deep unrstanding of why this is portant for nato, why this important for the larger international communit ani think that given the right meures of accounbility that we need to be seeking from presidenkarzai and his government, we're goingto see a commitment n just from germany but fromany ofur nato allies. >> rose: mightthey makeup whever the gap is between what general mcchrystals seeking and what the united stes is prepared to provide in terms of troops? >> well, ihink we have to wa for th president's announcement. buwe will be, as we have been, consulting very deeplyur ales and talng about what we want to see from them in order to have this integrated military and civian strategy. cause, remember it's not ju out troops on theground, it's about making sur that the people of afghastan see the results ofhis efft. that they ha more faithin their own governments of... as an enty thatan deliverfor em.
but there is no question that commercial property in the united states is in bad shape it is going down. and there is a lot of genuine worries about that. dubai as a symbol might focus more attention next week but i think dubai is postly about emerging markets. our home problems are very much about the united states and they are very big and they are much bigger, actually, than the problems in dubai. >> warner: so the u.s. problems you think are a lot bigger. >> the total losses from the crisis so far worldwide which mostly concentrate on the united states $1.7 trillion. we're talking about credit losses in dubai of perhaps $20 billion. so that an order of magnitude, two orders of magnitude smaller in dubai than what we have seen in the united states. the additional problems in the united states are another 100, 200, 300 billion but they are coming on top of all these existing problems. they are coming into a banking system that is weak already in the united states. >> warner: so briefly do we have reason to be nervous by what happened today in dubai. >> yes, it should make us nervous. came at an ago waurd
hnology is more important than ever in driving the united states economy and also 33 percent saying united states will be the global tech leader and a lot of americans think we will not. why is that? >> there's good reason to be concerned. it's not so much that america's innovation pro west is lagging but that the rest of the world is catching us. the recession has not helped with unemployment at ten percent we have good minds not contributing to the economy and we've seen anybody incorporate america has seen a lot of projects and r and d spending cut back as companies try to trim costs as their top line as shrunk so the survey captures the notion that both in the long-term and short-term there's things to be concerned about. > the first paragraph of the story says by most measures, america remains the world leader in technology achievement. consider the 2009 nobel prize winners of the 13 people honored nine were america's. not bad, right? >> but the nobel is a lagging indicator that people earn that typically at the end of their career for work that took place in many cases years and years pri
to our viewers in the united states and around the world. i'm fareed zakaria. we have a fascinating show for you today, a continuation of our conversation with maziar bahari, the "newsweek" reporter who spent four months in a prison in tehran. this week we hear of his release and his talks on the regime that jailed him. the main event is a conversation with eric schmitt, the ceo of what is surely the company most associated with the cutting edge of technology. google. we talk about innovation, technology and more. eric is perfectly qualified to discuss it all, a princeton-trained engineer he was chief technology officer at sun microsystems, then the ceo of novell before he took on the challenge of running google. innovation has always been on my mind. i've assumed this was an area where america remained head and shoulders above the world. that's where our future lies, how we'll move up the value chain and reuate new jobs for the future. over the last few months i've been having second thoughts. i've been reading these new studies that use not polls of experts but hard data and they sugge
for afghanistan. >> the united states cannot be engaged in an open-ended commitment. >> his attorney general prosecutes the plot's masterm d mastermind. >> in a courthouse just blocks away from where the twin towers once stood. >> this is a big step in the wrong direction. >>> topics this morning for our headliners. secretary of state hillary clinton and former new york mayor, rudy giuliani. hillary and rudy only on "this week." >>> then -- >> we don't have to continue to go down this controversy road. >> she's back. >>> george will, gwen ifill of pbs. david brooks of "the new york "mother jones." corn from >>> and as always, the sunday funnies. >> before john mccain chose her as his running mate, his campaign spent $50,000 on a background check. when he heard this, john mccain said we should have spent $75,000. >>> and we begin today with the secretary of state hillary clinton. thanks for spending time with us this morning. >> it's a pleasure to talk with you from singapore, george. >> wel and as you're in singapore, you and the president are facing really his toughest decision yet on afg
are destroying the economy of the united states. this election is going to be interesting to see just tell the public is feeling. host: which races are you watching? caller: it is a foregone conclusion that virginia and creigh deeds ran a terrible campaign. the new york 23rd is traditionally a republican district. it will almost certainly go republican. a democrat has not won since 1850. corzine is a wall streeter. host: you would not bit surprised if corzine loses? the president has been there five times to campaign for him? the >> people are concerned about the tax rates in new jersey. -- caller: people are concerned about the tax rates in new jersey. they're not happy with corzine's leadership. host: let's hear from a voter voting in today's new york city mayor's race. who are you going to vote for? caller: thompson. chost: why is that? caller: mayor bloomberg is for the rich. when i went downtown, all the buildings were nothing but luxury buildings. people are getting a rent increase every single year. in one of his commercials, he said that crime is down in new york city. he did not m
. another one of the controversies here is the aid with the united states. we have an enormous coal. forget the humanitarian reasons. a stable government -- we have an enormous goal. there is the homegrown terrorism that gets sent over to the united states, but they do not like it when we give them aid, and we say there are strings attached to it. >> we had a lot of discussion about that, because this became a very big issue. pakistan, and i do not think most of us in america really understood what is the beef? we are trying to demonstrate a long-term commitment to the development of pakistan, to your energy sector, to your infrastructure, the kinds of things that will provide a greater level of stability for the people of pakistan because their incomes will be rising, in their futures will look better. in the three days that i have been here, we could have raised some things differently. we could have been a little more sensitive to how we are perceived. i have been very clear. "look, if you guys do not want the aid, you do not have to take it. i think is important that we have this relati
portfolios over the largest bank holding companies of the united states accounting for about 2/3 of all the assets of the banking system. we were able to look across banks and examiners and asset classes and combined our usual examination procedures with off sight surveillance done by economists using a wide range of statistical methods. i think we learned a largement in that exercise -- large amount in that exercise. the confidence in the banking sector rose significantly but we also learned great deal about how to examine banks in a comprehensive way across the entire system. . i think, henry, i think going forward what we really need to know will be how to examine the system as a whole. i think one of the failures of regulatory oversight during the crisis was our -- when i talk about regulators in general, how individual firms and how each individual firm is doing. one of the things we've learned and very challenging for us as we go forward will be that we need to look at the whole system. we need to see how the markets have interact with each other. have interact with each other. we
to understand the future of the united states and asia is inextricably linked, the matters that matter most to our people, nonproliferation, clean energy. these are all issues that have to be part of a joint agenda, and we had a productive discussion about these issues this evening. >> for both countries, ties are critical. japan relies on the u.s. for its security. the you best allies -- the u.s. relies on japan as an ally in an unpredictable area. around this time of year the japanese by could blunt terms. they have been doing these things for centuries. people said it is time for a new relationship with the united states. >> we are gaining maturity and we need more people standing, ying,รง yes, america is not the way. >> i think president obama himself knows we need to respect each other. >> this brief visit is unlikely to resolve the issues between the two countries, including the relocation of a base in okinawa, but president obama is showing that the u.s. still the the use its relationship. >> report from washington over the past few of hours say khalid sheikh mohammed and four other
already slated to come to the united states. in fact, to come here to new york city because they are going to stand trial for the 9/11 attacks. among them, the self-proclaimed master mind, khalid shaikh mohammed. as you can imagine there are strong opinions whether his trial in civilian court works to his advantage. >> what we're kind of granting his wish. his wish was to be brought to new york and really makes no sense to me to be granting him his wish. he should be tried in a military tribunal. he is a war criminal. this was an act of war. >> the sheik, mohammed, wants to be considered a holy warrior, a jihadist, if we try him before military offices that image of a soldier will be portrayed by the islamic community. that's not the image we want. >> julie: we have the fox news team coverage of the latest developments. live in chicago, but first let's get to julie kirtz live in washington. so, julie, what are guiliani's main objections to the trials being held here in new york? >> yeah, he was pretty outraged. made a couple of points on fox news sunday. conducting trial in fork city will
to stay competitive. and it finds that the united states has made the least progress of the 36 nations in four regions studied. you can go to our website for the actual studies. consider the three most important technologies in alternative energy that are likely to yield big payoffs -- solar, wind and battery power. america doesn't measure up to asia in any of the three. take solar energy. japan and china each have three of the top ten companies in that field. america has only two. let's be clear. america still dominates the world of innovation by any measure, but the rest of the world is on the move and america is not doing enough in research, education, investment to stay ahead. like the star that shines brightest in the farthest reaches of the universe but has burned out at the core, america's reputation worldwide may be stronger than the facts warrant. one sign of this, in my question of the week last week, i asked what you thought about american innovation. a majority of foreign viewers saw america as still dominating t the future. a majority of americans had their doubts about am
about climate change. where india and the united states are actually both having a little difficulty taming this issue domestically. we both had serious domestic problems with what we would like to do. >> reporter: and this visit comes just as president obama is completing his strategy on afghanistan and actually india plays a key role in that equation. the united states thinks that the animosity between india and pakistan is actually having a bad effect on the efforts in afghanistan with india more focused, sometimes, on the threat from pakistan than it is on the threat from the taliban. john? >> jill dougherty for us at the white house, thanks so much. >>> in the next hour and a half or next half hour, susan malveaux has a behind the scenes look at what it takes to throw a state dinner. wait until you hear about the guests that come to these dinners and leave with the silv silverware. >> nice and classy there. >>> a critical warning for new moms and dads. the consumer product safety commission is recalling 2.1 million cribs. this is the biggest crib recall in history. they're telli
in the united states, significant announcent? >> yes, defitely. there had been a thoht that the president woulrefrain from putting anything psk on the table until the congre had acted. the house has acted if these numbers are in lin with what the hous has in their bill,ut the senate has just reportedded somethg out of comttee. nothing s reach the floor. so by putting h force behin these numbers, the presint is sort of settingp a negotiating line witthe congress and indicating probably what he feels is the minimu benth whenhesenate shouldn't go and a minimum of wt the world neez needs. a warming of three to four degreesahrenheit puts us in the nger zone as far as global warming is concerned, and these sorts of emissions reductions are consistentwith what we need to get od start combatting th warming. >> suarez: professor, ishat mething new for the united stes, specific ars and specific reduction perntages? >> back in the cnton administration, the u.s. did agree to specifiyears and specic reduction perntages, and they were emdied in the kyoto protocol whh president inton never sent up to t
in afgnistan. they're waiting,ike the rest of the world is, the united states and tough president ama to announce our inttions d our way forward. t they have a deep undetanding of why this is imrtant for nato, why this is important for the larger international community. and hink that given the right meases of accountality that we need to be seeking from president rzai and his government,e're going see a commitment notust from germany but from my of o nato allies. rose: might ey make whater the gap is between what general mcchrystal i seeking and what the united stas is prepared to provide in terms of troops? >> well, i tnk we have to wait for the president's nouncement. but will be,s we have been, consulting verydeeply o alli and talki about what we want to see from them in order to havehis integrated military and civili strategy. beuse, remember it's not just abt troops on theground, it's about making sure that the people of afghanian see the resultsof ts effor that they have more faith their own government aof... as an entit that c deliver r th. so the needs to be a lot more civi
president of the united states, not head of the republican party, she needs to broaden her coalition. the problem with that -- >> this country -- they might do it again. thank you ron brownstein, chris cilliz cillizza. join us tomorrow night at 5:00 eastern for more "hardball." time for "the ed show" with ed schultz zblrngs good evening, americans. welcome to "the ed show" tonight from new york. one week from tonight the president of the united states is going to lay out his strategy for afghanistan. newspapers are reporting today that the president will add, here's the number, 34,000 additional troops over the next year. president obama gave a preview to this decision this afternoon. >> after eight years, some of those years in which we did not have, i think, either the resources or the strategy to get the job done, it is my intention to finish the job. >> finish the job. make no mistake, this is just one more mess that president obama has to mop up after the bush administration. bush was the president who drained resources from afghanistan so we could go invade iraq on that perfect
that india's partnership with the united states is going to play an influential role in the 21st century. the two leaders discussed several pressing issues, including nuclear deals, climate change as well as the economy. >> mr. president, i bring to you and the people of the united states of america the friendly greetings of over 1 billion people of india. >> as leading economies, the united states and india can strengthen the global economic recovery, promote trade that creates jobs for both our people and pursue growth that is balanced and sustained. as nuclear powers, we can be full partners in preventing the spread of the world's most deadly weapons, securing loose nuclear materials from terrorists and pursuing our shared vision of a world without nuclear weapons. >> in less than three hours, the president and the first lady will host a state dinner for prime minister singh at the white house. now it's the obamas' first state dinner, and the question, of course, why was india's leader chosen for such an historic honor. our senior foreign affairs correspondent jill dougherty explains.
full circle to what we're doing here today in this important g-8 in the capital of the united states. i feel that a failure to articulate a meaningful, a global jewish identity is the biggest threat currently facing the jewish people. [applause] i want to see our people united, joined by global destiny and mission. a small people, but one that is influential and critical to civilization. we are all here today because ugc, the jewish federations of north america, had created a remarkable network with another organization where we can have communications about identity globally and envision tomorrow and create a stronger jewish future. when we do we can deal with the gall stones -- lies and forgeries. i think in this city they are fond of the expression "yes, we can," but this will take board. do not let this be simply a place for schmooze and catch up with friends and colleagues. we have a larger agenda to address. we must be a think tank to create a vision of jewish people for this century. we're here to create a division. who could have imagined that the jew would one day run at one of
you. >> it is and gentlemen, welcome to the chamber of commerce of the united states of america. my name is ron summers of the u.s.-india business council. for 34 years we have strived to advance u.s.-india commercial ties. today, what a historic event we have before us. more than ever, the business communities of both our countries are needed to provide an impetus to this important relationship. ladies and gentleman, please stand with me and help me welcome the individuals who are making this possible -- tom donahue, into a newly, ambassador chancre, and the hon. prime minister of india, dr. manmohan singh. [applause] >> thank you very much. good afternoon, ladies and gentlemen. prime minister singh, ambassadors, distinguished guests, welcome to the united states chamber of commerce. mr. prime minister, we are delighted to be hosting you and your delegation today. we are certain you will have a productive visit to the united states. you are among friends. joining us today are some of the foremost business leaders in america and india. we extend a special welcome to the chair of the
east and the united states did not arm israel in their wars, we never would have suffered 9/11. i do nothing anyone would have heard the name osama bin laden. we are going to be there for years and years. they talk about raising taxes on the ridge to pay for this war. they will be paying for it forever. thank you. host: the first official state dinner will be taking place in washington, "obama was big tent leaves out gop big wigs -- obama's big tent believes that gop big wigs. chief among for those not coming, john maynard -- john boehner and eric cantor. the president did not invite john mccain, even though mr. obama pledged a post-partisan presidency. -- presidency." we will have live coverage of the dinner giving way under -- getting way tonight at 9:00. there is also a press conference that will happen at 11:30 eastern time. the arrival ceremony was originally scheduled for the south lawn, it will be moving to the east room. lester, good morning from detroit. caller: good morning. listen, i do not have any problem with the rich being taxed for this war. over the years, you know,
from the cris so far worldwide which mostly concentrate on the united states $1.7 trillion. we're talkingbout credit sses in dubai o perhaps 0 billion. that an order of magnitude, tw orders of magnitude smaller in dubai than what we have senn the united states. the additional problems in the united states are another 100, 200,00 billion b they are coming on top of all these existing probls. they are comi into a banki system that is weak already in the uited states. >>warner: so briefly do we ve reason to be nervousby hat happened today in dubai. >> yes,t should make us nervou came at an ago waurd time. abu dhabi is closed for usiness until mondaso we don't know whateal they work ouuntil at least sunday. and if monday we have new rk opening without full relution of the issue, ithout total clarity it is going to be a difficult wee >> warner: si upon johnson of m.t. and the person institute, thank you so much. >> ank you. >> odruff: in other news today iran was censured r its nuclear pgram by the u.n.'s nuclear watch dog agency. 25 nations including cha and russia apoved the resol
nuke, if you will, in the united states, that's just something that's not an acceptable fear. so we're taking a rational, it seems to me, precaution. >> and you write in your piece that u.s. special forces could be used to take control of parts of pakistan's nuclear arsenal in case there was an emergency. just tell us the bare essentials of that plan. how would it work? >> well, as i understand it, in case of a loss of control in a remote area or in me facility, we have offered to the chief of staff of the army through our chairman of the joint chiefs, admiral mullen, we've offered a team that's already in place, a special operations team that's already doing some operations in other areas, helping the pakistanis train and work in afghanistan, we've offered them as a backup. in other words, it's all comity, we're all there to help, we're all big friends together. the only problem, of course, is that the americans are, as you know, as i wrote, are held -- the united states is not very popular in pakistan. and this kind of an agreement, if it became known, as it s become known, it wou
with the united states prior to the war in iraq. the reason we in theory a oppose the war was that we told the bush administration that would blind to that region and we don't underestimate the with them. for you to invade and occupy iraq will be equivalent to pandora's box of evils. you go there and you will unleash evils that we don't understand, all sorts of forest have been unleashed. it's actually run for any country in the world to go and occupy another country, dismantle its government, disbanded government, the spanish police force. and pretend that they know better. you made the decision. you looked to send your troops to iraq and i feel bad for every single human life that was lost in iraq, whether it was iraqi lives or american lives because those young soldiers didn't go there because they wanted to go there. this wasn't a decision taken by the bush administration. not every american situation like the war in iraq. what i'm trying to tell you is this is a controversial issue, but if you try to become part of the lies and forget you are an american and these are iraqis, believe
-winner. welcome to our viewers in the united states and around the world. wolf blitzer is off today. i'm suzanne malveaux, and you're in "the situation room." >>> president obama is about to reveal a new strategy for the war in afghanistan. he'll travel to the u.s. military academy at west point on tuesday where he's going to brief the nation on his plans to send more troops to the war zone. this week, he signaled that determination. >> after eight years, some of those years in which we did not have, i think, either the resources or the strategy to get the job done, it is my intention to finish the job. >> tens of thousands of troops are assumed likely to get marching orders, but will more troops make a difference? i put that question to cnn's veteran war correspondent, michael ware. >> it depends on what the michael hopes to achieve. if the president wants to put pressure on the taliban war machine, then yes, he needs to send more troops because right now with all of the u.s. and nato forces in afghanistan, the taliban machinery is virtually untouched. indeed, american operations are feeding in
's announcement of a new battle plan for afghanistan in a national address tuesday night from the united states military academy at west point. the military says it could include some 30,000 troops-- a roughly 50% increase in the number of u.s. forces there, but administration officials caution that the president has not settled on a final figure. in his thanksgiving address from the white house, mr. obama offered gratitude to troops overseas and their families. >> we keep in our thoughts and prayers the many families marking this thanksgiving with an empty seat, saved for a son or daughter, a husband or a wife stationed in harm's way. we say a special thanks for the sacrifices those men and women in uniform are making for our safety and freedom. >> reporter: president obama later made calls to 10 u.s. servicemen and women stationed in war zones to give his personal thanks. other nato leaders also are considering sending more troops to afghanistan, including german chancellor angela merkel. officials there were focused today on the forced resignations of the head of germany's armed forces and a
that i've had for a long time. particularly because i taught for five years at the united states military academy. and raised a in that amount, five years of young leaders who served in iraq, who have also served in afghanistan, and who have made an important contribution to the military of the nation. >> host: absolutely. i'm sure you've seen many of them. >> i have to say it's the most humbling and exciting experience to go into a theater of war and to see someone who you last saw as young cadet in command of soldiers. in fact, i had quite an experience going to visit a very good student, someone whom i had mentored very closely in may 2007 when he was commanding a company in southern baghdad. and i have to say, to see him in command, was as i said, one of the most humbling experiences. it really is unusual for a civilian to be able to see the fruits of teaching officership. >> host: right in the heart of it, southern baghdad. we will get to that. i think in reading this book, if i was a casual observer, i would still have no idea the extent to which you yourself were involved in the su
that whenever its firepower, the united states is impatient and will eventually go away. a visit to afghanistan reveals both sides of this complicated and ambitious strategy." we want to be more of your reaction to this story about king abdullah -- to this story about the withdrawal of abdullah abdullah. caller: this is a way for obama to disentangle himself from afghanistan under the pretense that we cannot further sacrifice troops in support of a government that is obviously corrupt. thank you. host: the secretary of state had the only response yesterday. israel put forth what the secretary called unprecedented concessions. netanyahu offered them in an effort to restart peace talks, a departure of the administration's earlier criticism of israel. meanwhile, the story this morning is inside a "the new york times." -- inside of "the new york times." "the secretary of state failed on saturday to slow down and not stopped the jewish construction of settlements on the west end. edward, good morning. caller: we need to enhance our relationships with all people. i think that obama should stand up an
to amend title 38, united states code and the service -- service members civil relief act to make certain improvements in the law regarding benefits administered by the secretary of veterans affairs and for other purposes. the speaker pro tempore: the question is, will the house suspend the rules and pass the s hat foreigners see this a bit differently. they think we are -- so that foreigners see this a bit differently. they think we are not doing nearly enough. host: next call, joe, good morning. caller: thank you for c-span. i would like to hear more on the mountaintop removal situation in west virginia. our climate is definitely changing because of mountaintop removal. we have had 2 million acres in the appalachians destroyed, one of the most reverse ecosystems in the world: flattened. over 2,000 miles of streams have beenuried. 62% of our streams are in west virginia -- 62% of our streams in west virginia are known to be polluted with heavy metals. the fish are contaminated. you cannot eat fish out of the streams. if you live in the proximity, a report that was suppressed by the bush
conversation, even though rick's not here, you can still call us, in the united states the number is 1-877-742-5751. >>> hey, rick, this is taylor, 35,000 more troops to afghanistan? no, we need to deploy them here and bring the troops over there here and take back our inner cities, fight the gangs, the crimes in our inner cities here, take care of home. >>> got a couple of big stories out of the white house today. it now turns out that the president is planning to make a personal appearance as a global climate change summit in copenhagen next month. and here's the real news t white house says that he is prepared to offer reduction of 17% in america's greenhouse gas emission, 17% below 2005 levels. that has potentially big ramifications, particularly for the cost of energy and the cost of doing business. but what's more important, your wallet or the earth? we'll be keeping an eye on that. >>> the other big story, afghanistan, the president's big announcement on troop re-enforcements is now set for tuesday evening, 8:00 p.m. eastern, from the campus of the united states military academy
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